Adoptive Families Blog

What to Expect at the Hospital When Your Baby is Born

Posted by Lifetime Adoption on November 14, 2019

hospital-baby-girlAfter a long journey of deciding to adopt, completing paperwork, waiting for an adoption opportunity, and getting to know the birth mother, the big day is finally here – it’s time to meet your baby!

The trip to the hospital is the often most anticipated event in an adoptive family's journey. To help you prepare, we've put together this quick guide on your adoption hospital experience. We also answer some of the most common questions that adoptive parents have and share an exclusive adoption webinar about what to expect when your baby arrives!

For most birth mothers, preparing for her baby's birth is one of the hardest things during her pregnancy. At Lifetime, we encourage each birth mother to develop her own hospital plan. This plan expresses her desires and needs for her hospital stay and labor. Her adoption hospital plan will inform the hospital staff, Lifetime, and you exactly how she wants her labor and hospital visit to be handled. Having this plan in place before she goes into labor allows everyone (especially you!) to concentrate on the birth of your baby. 

Before her baby's birth, the birth mother will make a hospital plan with her Adoption Coordinator. Some of the choices she has with that include:

  • Whether she is comfortable with you being present in the delivery room, or if she'd rather have you remain in the waiting room.
  • If she'd like you to take part in the birth process, and how (for example, some birth mothers invite the adoptive parents to cut the umbilical cord).
  • For birth mothers who already have a child, if they'd like their child to be at the hospital too.
  • Whether she'd like to be admitted to the hospital confidentially.
  • If she'd prefer to recover in an area away from the maternity ward.
  • Her desires to have family members, close friends, or other people in her support system with her at the hospital.
  • How much time she'd like to spend with her baby before saying goodbye.

One of the most important items in the hospital plan for adoptive parents is how involved you are during the labor and afterward. As they create their hospital plan, one of the questions that birth mothers are asked is whether they want the adoptive parents to be present for the birth. There's a range of options, from having you be in the waiting room to inviting you into the hospital room itself.

Proud adoptive parents with her newborn baby at the hospital

Most birth mothers will decide to have some time alone at the hospital, and Lifetime encourages this. Spending time with her baby provides the birth mother the opportunity to feel settled in her decision and make peace with it before placement. After all, you can't say "goodbye" before you've said "hello"! 

Remember, even if the birth is an emotional time for you, you definitely should stick with the birth mother's plan and respect her wishes. So that you can continue building your relationship with your baby's birth mother, attempt to make the hospital stay as comfortable as possible for her. 

The birthing experience and the moments afterward are for the birth parents, and you need to allow the birth family to have their moment before you are granted parental responsibility. Additionally, childbirth is physically and emotionally intense, so we recommend that you respect their time and space. Support them as they do what feels right to them at the hospital. It's good to keep in mind that until the birth parents sign the paperwork which terminates their parental rights, you don't (yet) have any legal rights to their child. So, you'll need to avoid making any decisions for the baby until the paperwork is signed. Even if a nurse asks you a question about the baby, the birth mother needs to be the one making those decisions right now.

Questions Adoptive Parents Ask About The Hospital Experience

When do we need to travel?

Once your birth mother goes into labor, Lifetime will contact you and notify you to travel. It's usually impossible to predict when she'll go into labor, so we don't recommend making travel plans based on her due date. Wait to receive directions from your adoption professional, and then prepare to travel as quickly as possible.

What should we bring?

Some basic items you'll want to pack include:

  • About three to four onesies
  • A couple of pairs of baby pajamas
  • Other baby clothing items in varying sizes 
  • Two receiving blankets
  • A cute outfit for the day you'll be discharged from the hospital
  • Two to four bottles
  • Two to four pacifiers
  • Gifts for the birth parents, if they're allowable per state law

And these are items you can purchase once you arrive in the birth mother's state:

  • Diapers
  • Formula
  • Car seat
  • Pack-n-play or travel crib where the baby can sleep

New adoptive parents gaze with wonder at their newborn baby girlWhen will we get to see the baby?

This is up to the birth mother, who will decide how things go in her hospital plan.

During her pregnancy, she will have made a hospital plan designating who she wants to see at the hospital, what role you'll play, how much time she wants with her baby, and more.

Can we bring a gift for the birth mother?

A gift of some kind is a sweet idea! Whether or not you're legally allowable to give the birth mother a gift depends on where you live. So you'll need to check in with your adoption attorney to see what gift ideas are allowable in your state.

When does placement happen?

Each state has different laws regarding adoption placement. Typically the birth mother can give written consent between 12 and 72 hours after giving birth. At this point, point custody will be transferred to you. Once a birth mother chooses you, your adoption attorney can provide you a closer timeframe.

What do we do after placement?

If your baby's birth mother lives in another state, you will need to stay in her state for 7-10 business days as you wait for ICPC clearance. ICPC stands for the Interstate Compact on the Placement of Children and makes sure that children placed into an adoptive family outside of their birth state get the right support services. After ICPC clears, you can go home and begin your new lives as parents!

Adoption Webinar: What to Expect When Baby ArrivesAdoption Webinar - What to Expect When Baby Arrives

If you'd like to learn more about the hospital experience as an adoptive parent, this webinar is an invaluable resource!

You'll hear from Lifetime’s Director, Heather Featherston, as she provides expert answers to the most-asked questions about bringing your baby home through infant adoption.

Get a glimpse at those sweet moments you’ve been dreaming of…the moment your baby is born, and and after. Discover how to balance flexibility with preparation as we discuss the roles of your attorney and home study once the baby is here, the moments you’ll meet your baby at the hospital, and what to expect with travel clearances and finalizing your adoption. We also offer tips and insights about the birth mother’s side of the process once her baby is born.

Click to watch Lifetime Adoption's webinar,
"What to Expect When Baby Arrives"
What to Expect at the Hospital When Your Baby is Born #adoption #adoptioneducation #adoptionresources
What to Expect at the Hospital When Your Baby is Born #adoption #adoptioneducation #adoptionresources
What to Expect at the Hospital When Your Baby is Born #adoption #adoptioneducation #adoptionresources

Topics: Infant adoption, Newborn Adoption, hospital preferences, hospital bag, adoption experience in the hospital, adoption hospital plan