Adoptive Families Blog

5 Questions All Adoptees Need Answered

Posted by Lifetime Adoption on March 26, 2020

Whether you are considering adoption or you have already adopted a newborn and are looking toward the future, you might worry about the questions your child will ask as he or she grows older.

Today, the nature of adoption has changed, and so have the types of questions children ask as they grow older. Open adoption answers many of the tough questions adoptees have asked in the past. As a result of open adoption, children no longer have to wonder what their birth parents’ names are, where they were born, or what their birth mother’s labor and delivery was like. Adoptive families that are open to sharing may discuss adoption and the child’s birth family openly.

Of course, this does not mean that there are no questions that remain. They are simply different and sometimes more in-depth. As your child grows, you might want to consider how you can answer or seek the answers to these common questions.

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Topics: Adoption Questions, Open Adoption, adoptee's story, open adoption questions, talking to children about adoption

How to Talk With Your Child About Adoption

Posted by Lifetime Adoption on August 29, 2019

It's vital to help your biological and adopted children understand who they are, and their importance in your particular family.

Author and psychotherapist Stacie Cahill is an adoptive mother who works with parents as they tackle adoption identity issues. She and her husband were blessed to adopt a baby girl, whom they named Chelsea. The adoption happened when their biological son, Jacob, was two.

Three years later, Jacob took it upon himself to describe adoption to Chelsea. He told her the stork brought her to their house. She was upset. Not a great way to describe adoption to a tender three-year-old!

At that point, Stacie knew that she had to give a better explanation. She wrote a book and dedicated it to Chelsea, explaining how she grew in her heart instead of her body. Stacie knew that adoption was part of her child's identity from the beginning.  This is why you should start talking to your baby about adoption as soon as possible.

If you have both biological and adopted children in your family, make sure you find ways for everyone to feel special and included. The more you talk about it, the less likely your children will have identity questions as they get older. Starting the adoption dialogue early can be very beneficial for the adopted child, and creates the foundation for conversations to come. Keep reading to discover tips on talking to children about adoption!

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Topics: Open Adoption, Parenting, Infant adoption, adoptive parenting, talking to children about adoption